Monthly Archives: April 2017

Education expense deductions can be beneficial to student taxpayers or their parents, however, knowing what qualifies as an appropriate expense is important. As the taxpayers in the next situation soon learned, even if you spend significant time educating yourself in various topics, if the expense is not deemed ordinary and necessary, it will be categorized […]

Business travel can add up to a costly expense for many individuals, which is why deductions are offered at tax time to help alleviate the sting. In the case of mileage deductions, maintaining adequate records is extremely important to validate the expense, as the taxpayer in the following situation soon learned. The Situation The taxpayer […]

Employees who are required to wear a specific uniform to work may qualify for a deduction at tax time as an unreimbursed employee expense. However, as the next situation proves, the required clothing must not be suitable for wear outside of the workplace. The Situation Ralph Lauren Corporation sells, markets, and designs a wide range […]

Educational tax credits can help taxpayers save when they file their return if they incurred any education-related expenses during the year. However, as the student in the following situation discovered, educational tax credits are based on what you actually paid, not what was billed. The Situation In 2010, the full-time Hampton University student registered for […]

Unknowingly engaging in fraudulent transactions or learning you are the victim of a scam is never a good thing. When you’ve lost some of your hard-earned money due to theft, fraud, or a scam, you may be able to deduct the amount at tax time. However, state laws have three criteria that must be met […]

Custodial Parent Rules

For purposes of deductions and exemptions, a custodial parent can claim a child as a dependent in many cases. The tax law has very specific rules about who can qualify as a custodial parent. The following describes a specific situation in which the rules of custodial parents needed to be examined closely to determine which […]

When planning for the next tax year, taxpayers should keep accurate records and receipts of any expenses they plan to deduct. However, if no records exist, the Cohan Rule may benefit the taxpayer in such that it states expenses may be reasonably and credibly estimated. The taxpayer in the next situation benefited from the Cohan […]

Once known as the Hope College credit, the American Opportunity tax credit can save taxpayers up to $2,500 on their 2016 return. Remember: A tax credit is a dollar-for-dollar reduction of your taxable income. In theory, the AOTC translates to $2,500 from the government each year for each qualifying college student in your household. While […]

If your spouse and children are U.S. citizens, it is easy to claim them on your tax returns. You just provide their name and Social Security numbers. It can be a bit more difficult to claim a non-U.S. citizen spouse or children on your return. But, you’re still able to claim them and take advantage […]

Higher Ed Deductions

After 2016, the Tuition and Fees Deduction will expire. Currently, you are eligible to deduct up to $4,000 from your taxable income for tuition expenses that you paid for either yourself, your spouse, or your dependents. Expenses paid in 2016 can be deducted if they were paid for one of the following purposes: Education during […]